Warhol, Sixty Artists, Fifty Year, Metropolitan Museum, New York
Warhol, Sixty Artists, Fifty Year, Metropolitan Museum, New York

The exhibition is structured in five thematic sections: "Daily News: From Banality to Disaster," "Portraiture: Celebrity and Power," "Queer Studies: Shifting Identities," "Consuming Images: Appropriation, Abstraction, and Seriality," and "No Boundaries: Business, Collaboration, and Spectacle."

Daily News: From Banality to Disaster "Daily News: From Banality to Disaster" explores Warhol's engagement with the imagery of everyday life, his interest in items of consumerist American culture in the 1960s, and its his keen attention to advertising, tabloids, and magazines. This section also examines the connection to later artists who also appropriate objects from the supermarket or the department store or share Warhol's fascination with disaster or death, including Jeff Koons, Damien Hirst, and Ai Wei Wei. Left: Andy Warhol (American, 1928–1987). Green Coca-Cola Bottles, 1962. Acrylic, silkscreen, and graphite on canvas, 82 3/8 x 57 in. (209.2 x 144.8 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, purchase, with funds from the Friends of the Whitney Museum of American Art © 2012 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Right: Ai Weiwei (Chinese, born 1957). Neolithic Vase with Coca-Cola Logo, 2010. Paint on Neolithic vase (5,000-3,000 BC), 9 3/4 x 9 3/4 x 9 3/4 in. (24.8 x 24.8 x 24.8 cm). Mary Boone, New York Portraiture: Celebrity and Power "Portraiture: Celebrity and Power" looks at Warhol's engagement with portraiture to illuminate contemporary artists' continuing interest in the issues of fame or infamy in the age of the tabloid. Here the best of Warhol's notable portraits of celebrities are paired with contemporary examples by Elizabeth Peyton, Karen Kilimnik, and Cindy Sherman. Warhol's practice of society portraiture of the 1970s, as well as his artistic engagement with political figures, is explored here through links with the work of artists who take this practice in new directions. Left: Andy Warhol (American, 1928–1987). Red Jackie, 1964. Acrylic and silkscreen on canvas, 40 x 40 in. (101.6 x 101.6 cm). The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. © 2012 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Right: Alex Katz (American, born 1927). Lita, 1964. Oil on canvas, 60 x 60 1/8 in. (152.4 x 152.7 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York, gift of Lita Hornick, 1991 © Alex Katz/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY Queer Studies: Shifting Identities "Queer Studies: Shifting Identities" outlines Warhol's importance as an artist who broke new ground in representing issues of sexuality and gender in the post-war period. This section also strives to represent a new openness toward different varieties of queer identity that Warhol's oeuvre ushered in, largely through work by photographers such as Richard Avedon, Peter Hujar, Christopher Makos, Robert Mapplethorpe, and Catherine Opie. Left: Andy Warhol (American, 1928–1987). Self-Portrait, 1986. Acrylic and silkscreen on canvas, 80 x 80 in. (203.2 x 203.2 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Purchase, Mrs. Vera G. List Gift, 1987 (1987.88). © 2012 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Right: Douglas Gordon (British, born 1966). Self-Portrait as Kurt Cobain, as Andy Warhol, as Myra Hindley, as Marilyn Monroe, 1996. C-Print, 29 1/2 x 29 1/2 in. (75 cm x 75 cm). Audrey Irmas, Los Angeles © 2012 Studio lost but found. Courtesy Gagosian Gallery Consuming Images: Appropriation, Abstraction, and Seriality "Consuming Images: Appropriation, Abstraction, and Seriality" explores Warhol's formal strategies and groundbreaking use of pre-existing photographic sources, often endlessly repeated in grid patterns; his appropriation of art history; and his interest in abstraction. These works are grouped with Pictures Generation artists such as Richard Prince and Cindy Sherman for their uses of appropriation, or with contemporary painters such as Christopher Wool, whose patterned painting Untitled plays with all-over abstraction and seriality in Warholian ways. Left: Andy Warhol (American, 1928–1987). Cow Wallpaper, 1966. Silkscreen on wallpaper, 46 x 28 in. (116.8 x 71.1 cm) each. The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh © 2012 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Christopher Wool (American, born 1955). Untitled, 1988. Alykd and flashe on aluminum, 72 x 48 in. (182.9 x 121.9 cm). Courtesy the artist and Luhring Augustine, New York No Boundaries: Business, Collaboration, and Spectacle "No Boundaries: Business, Collaboration, and Spectacle"—the final section of the exhibition—examines Warhol's interest in artistic partnership through filmmaking, magazine publishing, music, and design. Also foregrounded is his fascination with creating environments that envelop the viewer entirely. Warhol's frequent use of decorative motifs, such as flowers, are part of this practice, and are contrasted with similar work by artists such as Jeff Koons and Takashi Murakami. Left: Andy Warhol (American, 1928–1987). Flowers, 1964. Acrylic and silkscreen on canvas, 24 x 24 in. (61 x 61 cm). Mugrabi Collection © 2012 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Right: Jeff Koons (American, born 1955). Wall Relief with Bird, 1991. Polychromed wood, 72 x 50 x 27 in. (182.9 x 127 x 68.6 cm). Private collection © Jeff Koons

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